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Roche Abbey

Possessions

The landed possessions of Roche Abbey were for the most part situated in the West Riding of Yorkshire, and within a few miles of the spot on which the Abbey was built. Other lands of importance were in the neighbouring counties of Nottingham, Lincoln, Derby, and Lancaster.

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Abdy

Situated five miles north of Rotherham, but what it was or who gave it is not known. It probably came into the hands of the monks after the year 1232, and could not have been of great value, as, in 1535, along with Haugh and Rawmarsh were together estimated at only 33s. 0d. per annum.

Aggecroft

This grange, with its appurtenances, given by the Founders, and confirmed to the monks by Alice, Countess of Eu.

Alverley

Between 1238 and 1254, exchanged for some lands in Slade Hooton, belonging to Robert de Ripariis (Ripars).

Anston

Nicholas de Saint Paul gave an oxgang of land with a toft and croft here, and confirmed to the monks what had been given to them by Leo de Manvers, and Michael, his son. He also gave them all the woods and rents which he had recovered from the Leo and his son. (See Brancliffe) The monks held land in Lumby and Aston in 1535, for which they paid 1d. to the heirs of Westnis ( Wasteneys)

Armthorpe

Arneldthorpe /Arneldthorpe - The grange was given them by Thomas de Arnethorpe before 1186. Roger, son of Hugh Fitz Walter, gave two oxgangs of land with a toft and croft, and a culture called Gunhale, with the North-wood , which Agnes, daughter of Robert de Brunington, quitclaimed. William, son of Henry de Marisco, in 1246 quitclaimed all his rights in the inclosures. Adam, son of Ralph de Armthorpe, gave one oxgang of land here. Henry de Armthorpe of Pollington, son and heir of Adam de Armthorpe, quitclaimed all his rights in the manor of Armthorpe in 1330. Jeremiah, the parson of Rossington, gave all his meadow in the fouth part of the wood here, called South-wood. In 35 Henry III the Abbot of Roche had a grant of free warren here. This grant was disputed in the time of Edward I., and the abbot was summoned to show by what warrant he claimed free warren. The charter of Henry III., showed his right. In 9 Edward II. the Abbot of Roche was returned Lord of Armthorpe. He had in his employ a Steward (Sir William Fitz William), a Bailiff (Miles Wyn), a Forester, and a Granger, who was a monk. Roger, son of Hugh Fitz Walter, gave two oxgangs of land with a toft and croft here, and a culture called Gunhale, with the North-wood in this territory, which Agnes, daughter of Robert de Brunington, quitclaimed.

Arncliffe

The monks of Roche had possessions in the neighbourhood of Arncliffe

Ashover

Property in this place, which is also called Aexoure, in Derbyshire, was given to the monks before the year 1186, by Simon de Plesley. It was still in their hands in 1232, but seems to have been dispossessed of before the dissolution.

Askern

In the Confirmation of Henry III. the monks are returned as having property in this place. At the dissolution it remained in their hands.

Balne

Henry, son of Maurice de Askern, gave one oxgang of land here, it does not seem to have remained long in the hands of the monks.

Barnby

Gervas de Barnby gave the monks the Grange before 1186; in 1245, Benedict, the Rector of Barnby, gave them the tithe of the grange also. In 10 John, there was a fine between William Fitz Thomas and Alice his wife, and Osmund the Abbot of Roche, in which a verdict was returned for the abbot of 1 bovate of land with the appurtenances in Barnby. In 13 Henry III., there was a fine between the Abbot of Roche and William, son of Richard de Barnby, in which William acknowledged and granted for himself and his heirs that the aforefaid abbot and his successors would, have common right of pasture for the whole year, for every kind of beasts from the grange of the abbot, except goats, everywhere in the wood of William de Barnby; and they would have pigs in the wood. And, William granted for himself and his heirs, that the abbot and his successors would have and receive every year from the aforefaid wood, fix cartloads of wood for ever, to wit, 2 cartloads of good building timber, of oaks not shaped, and 2 cartloads of wood for burning, and other 2 for fencing. At the dissolution the yearly value of Barnby grange was given as 7 10s.8d. John Green, bailiff and receiver of Barnby, had 10s. per annum at the dissolution. In 36 Henry VIII., the manor of Barnby, was granted to Richard Turke, citizen of London.

Barnoldswick

The grange here is mentioned in King Henry's Valor as one of the possessions of the monks of Roche, and is valued at 8 per annum. It does not seem to have belonged to them in 1232, as no mention is made of it in the confirmation of Henry III. It was here that the monks of Kirkstall first settled in 1147.

Bawtry

The Abbot of Roche had property here in 1232, it had been disposed of before the dissolution.

Bilham

In the reign of King John, William de Barvile gave to the monks of Roche four oxgangs in this place and quitclaimed his right in four other oxgangs, which Henry de Wort(h)ley unjustly detained.

Blythe

John de Kyveton, parson of Radcliffe-on-Trent, made a fine with the King of 20s.for license to assign 1 messuage, 36 acres of land, 3 acres and 24s. of rent, with the appurtenances in Blythe and Torworth, to the Abbot of Roche and the convent of the said place. In Edward II. the Prior of Blyth held of the Honour of Tickhill the whole town of Blyth in demesne in pure alms, except 40s. which the Abbot of Roche held in that town in exchange for the mill of Serlby in Nottinghamshire.

Braithwell

The monks seem to have had no property here until the beginning of the thirteenth century. An oxgang of land with pasture for 80 sheep was granted them by Thomas, son of Artrop de Braithwell, who also confirmed all that his ancestors had given, and Richard, his brother, confirmed the same. William, son of Gerbode gave ten acres of land in the fields of this town, with pasture for 60 sheep, and Robert, his brother, gave twenty acres of land in the same fields, with pasture for six score sheep. The monks of Roche had therefore the right of pasture here for 280 sheep. Before the dissolution the monks paid one quarter of corn yearly at the mill of Coningsborough from the land which they held in Braithwell. After the dissolution the house and land of the abbot, together with some property called Bellstring Lands, were let to W. Wilson at 1 16s. 2d. per annum, paying thence to the crown 24s. and to Lord Hundesdon at his manor of Coningsborough one quarter of wheat. In 1563 all this property was granted to Charles Jackson, of Firbeck, Notts., gent., at 32 years purchase 16 17s,4d. The wood and underwood were sold the next year to Charles Jackson and Wm. Mason, for 40 marks.

Bramley

Mabilia, the widow of Ote de Tilli, the seneschal of Coningsborough, gave two oxgangs of land with a toft and croft here, of her lordship of Bramley, the monks were not to have common pasture for more than a hundred sheep. She also confirmed three oxgangs in the same place. The monks first had property here about the year 1190. The abbot paid 7d. rent to Roger Fretwell for land in Bramley. Bramley Grange of the Abbot of Roche became the seat of the Spencer's after the dissolution.

Bramwith

Gervis de Barnby gave the grange here, before 1186. William, son of William de Bladesworth, gave and confirmed what he had here, and what the monks held of the fee of Allen de Hooton. In 3 King John, there was a fine between William de Insula and Osmund, Abbot of Roche, tenant of 2 carucates of land with the appurtenances in Bramwith. Verdict to William. And William granted to the aforefaid Abbot and his successors all the aforefaid land with the appurtenances, to hold of him and his heirs at the service of 2 marks per annum, save foreign service. In 10 Henry III., there was a fine between Adam of Halyhton and Jane his wife, Robert, son of Richard, and Susanna his wife, plaintiffs; and Richard (? Reginald) Abbot of Roche, tenant of one bovate of land and half a fishery, with the appurtenances in Bramwith. The rents of assize and customary tenements here were valued in 34 Henry VIII. at 3 15s. 9d. The manor of Bramwith at the dissolution was granted to Richard Turke, citizen of London.

Brancliffe

1411. Confirmation by Ralph Pluket to the monks of Roche of the land of Brancliffe, in Anston, which they held when John, count of Mortain, rendered to the grantor the town of Anston, and wood and land on one side of the stream as far as Thorpe Salvin and on the other side of his mill-stream a furlong in breadth and in length as far as their land extends, namely to the bounds of Shireoaks; also tillages called Herdewikecroft and Botildewellewong, and pasture for 9 score sheep and the oxen of their grange. 1189-1201

Bridlington

Odenell, son of Nicholas d'Aubeney, gave one mark per annum out of his mill at Bridlington. There is no mention of this gift in the list of the possessions of Roche at the dissolution.

Brookhouse

Appears in the 'Valor Ecclesiasticus' of Henry VIII as one of the places belonging to Roche.

Broom Riddings

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Bugthorpe

Idonea, wife of Nicholas de Bugthorpe, gave two acres of land here.

Callinglow

Near Oneash grange, and formed part of the property which the monks had in Derbyshire at the dissolution.The farm of the grange in the Peak, called Calengelawe, with all lands, meadows, pastures, etc., parcel of the possessions of the late monastery of Roche, freely reigned, were in 1540 demised to John Leke, Esq., at 40s. per annum.

Campsal

The monks had something here at the dissolution

Carlton

The ancestors of the King (4 Edward I.) had one manor in Carlton, belonging to the Crown, which was wont to yield 10 per annum, of which, King John gave to one Eustachius de Ludham and his heirs 30s. yearly. And King Henry III. gave the residue, to Algret, the Cross-bowman by his charter, and Algret gave that rent to the Abbot of Roche, who then held it, and paid the King 6d. yearly. The Abbot had 20 acres of meadow of the fee of Tickhill. Sarah, relict of Richard de Bawtry, quitclaimed all her right in one oxgang of land here. In 3 1 Henry III., the Abbot of Roche obtained a charter of confirmation of liberties and privileges in the manor of Carlton-in- Lindric,. The monks did not hold this property long, as we find from the following charter :
Royal Charter
Inasmuch as we have learnt by an inquisition which we have caused to be made by Hugo de Rodmerchewyet, in the county of Notts., that it is not to the injury or prejudice of ourself or others if we grant to the Abbot and Convent of Roche, power for them to give and grant 10 librates of land and rents with the appurtenances in Carlton-in-Lindrik, which the said Abbot and Convent hold of us by the service of a pair of gilt spurs or 6d. per annum for all service, to our beloved and faithful Richard de Furneys (Furnival) to have and to hold to Richard and his heirs of us and our heirs, we willing to do the Abbot and Convent a special favour in this behalf have given license as far as in us lies for them to be able to give and grant the aforefaid 10 librates of land and rents with the appurtenances to Richard, and his heirs of us and our heirs as aforesaid, and to Richard we in like manner grant as a special favour by these presents power to receive the said 10 librates of land and rents from the aforefaid Abbot and Convent, being unwilling that the Abbot and Convent by reason of the donation and grant of the 10 librates of land and rent, or Richard or his heirs by reason of the reception of the same should by us or any of our heirs whatever be disturbed, molested, or in any way aggrieved. Tested at Canterbury the 1st day of October, 1295.

Carr

At the dissolution the yearly rents of Slade Hooton and Carr were valued at 9 8s.1d.

Catwick

William, son of Gilbert de Catwick gave in 1263 one essart of land with a toft in this place.

Chatsworth

Adam de Edinsor gave 20 acres of land upon Stanhege, in the territory of Chatsworth in Derbyshire, with pasture for 200 sheep and 60 cattle, 40 hogs and 6 saddle horses, with their produce of two years of age.

Conisbrough

Although many of the benefactors of Roche lived here, the monks never seem to have had large possessions in Conisborough. Robert, son of Glai, gave the land and wood of this place as far as White Well, between the road and the river. The grant was confirmed by Pope Urban in 1186. It was in their hands in 1232, but had been disposed of before the dissolution, when they paid 2s. 6d. rent for the mill of Conisbrough.

Cudworth

About the middle of the 13 century, Thomas, son of Robert, of Ecclesfield, quitclaimed to the Abbot and Convent of Roche, for ever, all right and claim that ever he had in 4 bovates of land with the appurtenances in Cudworth, which Henry of Selesai gave them; the Abbot for the quitclaim paying 2 marks of silver.

Cumberworth

Charter of William, Earl Warren: To all whom this present charter may come, William Earl Warren, know that I have granted, the Blessed Mary and the monks of the Rock, all the land of Cumbrewode, with the messuages and appurtenances which Matthew de Shepley gave and confirmed to them by his charters, to hold in perpetual alms according to the tenor of the charter of Matthew. Witnesses: William son of William, Malveisin de Hersy, Richard de Memers, Baldwin de Hersy, Robert de Brettvile, Ralph de Eccleshale, John de Wakling, clerk; John Wakefield, clerk; Reginald Coc.

Deepcar

Along with Rawmarsh, Abdy, and Haugh, was valued at the dissoution at 33s.9d.

Doncaster

The two following charters give a account of the property of the monks in Doncaster:
Charter of William de Rossington
I, William, son of Wulsagh, of Rossington, have granted and given, to the Monks of Roche, my toft in Doncaster, with the appurtenances in which I abode, which I held of Ralph, son of William Albus, near the church of St. George, to have and to hold for ever. Paying thrice yearly to Ralph, and his heirs, 2s., at the four stated terms (of the year) in Doncaster. Moreover, I have granted and given to the monks that land which I held of Walter, son of Leon, paying thrice yearly to Walter or his assigns 4d. for all service and demand, at the four statute terms in Doncaster. Moreover, I have granted and given to the monks 4d. in my lifetime, yearly, to be paid at the four statute terms in Doncaster. Witnesses: Jeremiah de Rossington, William, his brother, Hugh de Langethwait, Peter de Waddeworth, Reginald, the bailiff, Henry de Marsh, John, son of Eudo de Bruntot.
Charter of Amabill of Brampton
I, Amabill, daughter of Robert de Brampton, formerly wife of Roger, son of William Strie, in my widowhood and free power have granted and quitclaimed of me and my heirs for ever to Michael de Brampton, my brother, and his heirs, to give and assign to whomsoever and at whatever time he may please, all the right and claim which I had or might have had under the name of dowry, or in any manner or occasion, in all that land with the buildings and the appurtenances in the town of Doncaster, which William de Warmsworth, chaplain, conferred upon the Abbot and Convent of Roche, to wit, that which lies between the land which Gena de Castello held, and the lane which extends from Francis street towards the Church of St. George, in length and breadth, as William Albus, my grandfather, held it, without any reservation. In such manner, to wit, as that neither I nor any of my heirs shall be able henceforth to place or require any right, or claim, or challenge in the said land, and that this my grant and quitclaim may remain ratified and firm, I have confirmed this present charter with my seal. Witnesses: Peter de Waddeworth, Reginald de Ketelbergh, Peter de Rosington, Richard,son of Hugh, Adam de Scawsby, John Bruntat, (?) Robert, his brother, Reginald, the tailor, Reginald, son of Reginald, and others.
The Abbot of Roche had property here at the dissolution, at which time they paid eleven pence three farthings rent to the provost of the Lord the King of Coningsborough, issuing from the land in Doncafter with its members. William de Warmsworth, chaplain of this place, also gave the monks a piece of land with certain buildings here

Dunscroft

The Abbot of Roche erected a grange here for the management of his possessions at Hatfield.

Eilrichthorpe

This place, which adjoined the abbey grounds, was given to the monks soon after the foundation, by Richard de Busli, son of the Founder/

Ewes

Walter, son of John de Wolvethwait, gave all his land here. The property of the monks at Ewes, (Maltby) called Holtheng, was given at the dissolution to Robert Thornhill, of Walkeringham, and Hugo his brother, who in 1547 granted it to John Sanderson.

Ennuse

In 1248, the Abbot of Roche gave Henry III 5 marks for having seizen of the mill of Ernuse in Nottingham.

Firbeck

Walter, son and heir of John de Wolvethwaite, gave an annuity of 6d. out of a toft here. The monks had property here at the dissolution.

Fishlake

William, Earl of Warren, gave the tithe of the eels caught in his fisheries here.

Flixburgh

William, son of Henry de Arcy gave the monks a sufficient carriage road between North and South Stather, near the Trent, in Lincolnshire, with a convenient place at which to load and unload ships or vessels. After the dissolution, the meadow is valued at 10s. per annum.

Gildingwells

The monks possessed something here at the dissolution

Goderic-Riding

This property lay between Wadworth and Wellingly, and was the gift of John de Chaworth. William Chaworth, mentioned in the following charter, was one of the lords of Wadworth in 1236.
Charter of William de Chaworth
Know all of you that I have given, granted, and by this my charter confirmed to the Monks of Roche, all that part which I had in my domain in Godrikeriding. To wit, the land at West, which the aforefaid John gave to them, and I in like manner have given to the monks all the brush which lies between the land of Eudo (de Wadworth) and the brook which runs toward the grange of Wellingly . Witnesses: Ralph, priest of Wadworth, Henry de Chaworth, Robert, son of Payn, Robert, son of Gebod, William, son of Eudo, Godfrey de Wadworth, Robert, son of William.

Harworth

The monks had property here as early as the end of the 12th century. 2 miles East of Tickhill, its old name was Farwath. Gamellus de Harworth gave 1 oxgang of land here which he held of the fee of Robert, son of Ralph de Styrrup. Robert de Styrrup gave 1 toft at the west end of the town of Harworth, with 1 acre of land near it, and pasture for 120 sheep.

Hatfield

William, Earl of Warren, gave the tithe of his eels here after the monks of Lewis had taken their tithe. John, Earl of Warren, Beholding the scarcity of fruits, rents, and possessions generally pertaining to the religious men, the Abbot and Convent of Roche, and to their monastery, and admiring the magnificence of the stone work as well in the buildings of the Abbot and Convent as in their monastery; also nobly grieving for the paucity of monks, gave for the support of 13 additional monks the advowson of the Church of Hatfield, then valued at 70 marks per annum. In 1345, King Edward III granted license to the Earl to effect this gift:
Royal Charter.
Know that inasmuch as our beloved cousin John de Warenn, Earl of Surrey, holds the manor of Haytfield with the appurtenances for his whole life, by the gift and grant of Lord Edward, lately King of England, our father, in such a manner that after the death of the earl the manor with the appurtenances, with remainder to Matilda de Feyrford for the term of her life, and after the death of Matilda, to John de Warenn, son of Matilda, and the heirs male, and after the decease of John, if he die without heir male , to Thomas, brother of John and the heirs male, and after the decease of Thomas, if he die without heir male, to the heirs of the body of the earl, and if the earl die without heir, then the said manor with the appurtenances, to revert entirely to our said father and his heirs, as in the letters patent of our said father, thereupon executed more fully is contained; (inasmuch as Matilda is dead, and the aforefaid John, son of Matilda, and Thomas have taken the habit of religion in the order of the brothers of the Hospital of John of Jerusalem, in England, at Clerkenwell, and in the said order are professed,) we will grant to the earl power to give and grant the advowson belonging to the Church of Haytfeld, which he holds from us in chief, which church is worth 70 marks per annum, to the Abbot and Convent of Roche, we have granted and given license for us and our heirs, to the earl that he may give and grant to the Abbot and Convent to have and to hold to themfelves and successors from us and our heirs for the term of the life of the earl, and to the Abbot and Convent by the tenor of these presents we have given special license to receive the said advowson from the earl, and to hold to them, the statute enacted about not placing land and tenements in mortmain notwithstanding. We will, moreover, grant for us and the Abbot and Convent that they may have and hold the said advowson in pure and perpetual alms for ever, and that they may have power to appropriate the said church after the gift and grant of the advowson aforefaid by the earl to them made, when they fee expedient, and may hold it thus appropriated to their own uses to them and their successors for finding 13 monks chaplains to celebrate for ever divine offices in the Abbey of Roche for us, Philippa Queen of England, our Consort, and our dearest children, and for the said earl, also for the soul of William our son, and for the souls of our progenitors and those of the earl and all the faithful defunct: the statute aforefaid or any right which might belong to us after the death of the said earl Abbot and Convent ... .Witness, the King at Westminster, November 22nd, 1345
The appropriation was effected by William la Zouch, Archbishop of York, he reserving certain rights.
In 1348, 3 years after they had obtained this important gift, the Abbot and Convent of Roche, parsons of the Church of Hatfield, set forth in petition to parliament that they ought to have each year an oak in the park or woods of Hatfield; and instead of tithe of herbage, 60 large beasts running in the park. And instead of tithe of pannage, to have all their pigs which are fed in the parsonage, running in the same woods without paying anything for pannage; and further for the tithe of the fishery of Brathmere and Neuslet, a bynde of eels every year to be taken as the right of the Church of Hatfield. The Earl of Warren being dead, and the manor in the hands of Queen Philippa, they prayed that certain impediments might be removed. They were referred to the chancellor, who was to call all parties together and to do justice amongst them.
In 1355, on the day of Pentecost, an indenture was made between the Abbot and Convent of Roche, on the one part, and Thomas Rillington, John Fitz Peter, Thomas Margens, Alan del Cotes, John, his brother, John del Parkes, John Fitz Peter de Stainford, parishioners of the Church of Hatfield, on the other part, that the Abbot of Roche, having the Church of Hatfield appropriated, granted and permitted that the parishioners, and other the inhabitants of the town of Stainford, might, by the archbishop's license, maintain at their own cost a chaplain to celebrate divine service in the Chapel of Stainford, newly builded, for 3 years daily, excepting on Sundays and other great festivals, whereon they were to repair to the parish church of Hatfield. This agreement was confirmed by the archbishop's vicar general on the 1st November, 1535.

Haugh

The monks had property here, near Rawmarsh, at the dissolution

Hellaby

Mauger son of Roger Stokes confirmed the grant of 6 oxgangs of land a year, made by Geoffrey Fitz Payne of Newerth. The property here and at Bramley was valued at the dissolution at 9 18s.8d.

Hesley

The monks owned property here at the dissolution.

Hestwell

The monks had property here, the gift of William the Fleming, which was confirmed by Pope Urban III. in 1186.

Holme

Peter de Rossington gave the monks a wood here, later called "Holmes Carr Wood"

Hooton Levet

In 1249, Manselyn, of Doncafter, Manselyn, of Brodsworth, and Elias, son-in-law of Manselyn, released to the Abbot and Convent of Roche all lands, rents, and tenements which they had of Hamond de Levet, in the territory of Hooton Levet, from the beginning of the world to the world's end. Hamond, son of William Levet, gave 1 oxgang of land, with a toft and croft in this place. Richard, son of William Levet, gave half of the mill here, with the pool and free water course from Maltby mill to the Monk's mill, with the suit of the said moiety, reserving a right to himself, his heirs and assigns, to grind all their corn that shall grow upon 4 oxgangs in this territory, at a multure of the 16th bowl. Jordan, son of Jordan de Insula, and Elizabeth his wife, gave all their land at Hooton-Levet. Adam, son of Simon de la Roche, and Joan his wife, daughter of Robert de Wickersly, gave one oxgang of land here, with a toft and croft, which gift Sir Robert de Wickerfley, knight, confirmed. Henry de Lacy granted and confirmed the donation which Richard de Wickerfley, and Roger and Jordan Hooton, made to the monks of Roche of common pasture of all the territory of Hooton. The property here was valued at the dissolution at 4 19s.2d. per annum.

Hooton Roberts

The monks had a farm at this place which was valued at the dissolution at 1s. per annum

Hope

The monks possessed something here at the dissolution.

Ichells

Described in 1552 as 'a close called Ichells, lying near the dyke leading from Haugh to Wentworth on the east, in the tenure of Thomas Wentworthe, Esq., at the will of the Lord the King from year to year, paying at the terms of St. Martin in winter and Pentecost equally 9s. per annum.' It was at this time granted to Admiral Lord Clinton.

Ickles

The Monks had two mills in Ickles, near Rotherham

Ingbirchworth

The monks had property here at an early date:
Charter of Henry de Shelley
I, Henry de Shelley, son of Robert, have given, granted, and by this my charter confirmed for the welfare of my soul and of all my ancestors and heirs, to the Abbot and Monks of St. Mary of Roche, the homage and service of John, son of Robert del Ker (Car) which he owed to me and to my heirs or assigns for two bovates of land with the appurtenances in Bircheworth, and the homage and service of John, son of Adam, which he owed to me and my heirs and assigns for one bovate of land with the appurtenances in the same vill, and two bovates of land with the appurtenances which Richard and Joan held of me in the same vill, and the said Richard and Joan with all their progeny, and the said Robert and Adam with all their progeny, and one bovate of land with the appurtenances which Gilbert, the chaplain, held of me in the same vill, which is called Wetelay, to have and to hold in perpetual alms, free and quiet from all service to me and to my heirs belonging, save foreign service, as far as pertains to 1 carucate of land, 9 carucates of which make one knight's fee. And I and my heirs will warrant all the aforefaid land with the appurtenances to the aforefaid Abbot and Monks of Roche for ever against all men. These being witnesses : Dom. Henry, parson of Rothell ; Hugh de Urnethorp, then steward of Pontefract; Robert de Stapleton, Henry Walent, Robert, son of Adam; Thomas de Littel, Alan, son of Robert de Smeaton; Robert, son of Gilbert; Simon, son of ... ; Alan, son of Alan.

Insseby

Simon Fitz Simon, gave land in this place, which Pope Urban III. confirmed

Kilnhurst

In 1385, the Abbot and Convent of Roche granted in fee to John Montforth, of Kilnhurst, 1 messuage, 4 acres of meadow and 6 acres of land in the town and territory of Kilnhurst, 4 acres of which lie near the wood of Rawmarsh, on the east; one acre abutting on Walkerfall, and one acre abutting on the town of Kilnhurst, all which they had of the gift of Roger de Kilnhurst: and that ... which extends itself to the north field of his toft. Also one half acre of meadow which they had of the gift of Thomas de Kilnhurst, reserving therefrom 13s. 4d. rent, and a double payment from every tenant at his first entry, which if not paid within 40 days, would give the Abbot the right to re-enter and seize upon the tenements again. The profits of this place together with those of Ickles and Hooton Roberts, were at the dissolution 1 7s.8d.

Kiveton

Royal Charter
Know that, inasmuch as Lord Edward, lately King of England, our grandfather, by his letters patent granted and gave license for himself and his heirs to John de Kyveton, parson of the Church of Radeclyf-on-Trent, to give and assign 1 messuage, 36 acres of land, 3 acres of meadow, and 24s. rent, with the appurtenances in Blithe and Torworth, to the Abbot and Convent of Roche, to have and to hold to them and their successors for finding a certain secular chaplain to celebrate divine offices for the soul of the said John and the souls of his father, mother, and his ancestors and all the faithful departed, in the Chapel of the Holy Trinity of Kyveton every day, and also the same our grandfather granted and gave license for himself and his heirs to the aforefaid Abbot and Convent to give and grant to the aforefaid John for the tenements aforefaid a certain corrody, to be received from the said Abbey to him and his heirs for the sustenance of the said chaplain for ever, and to the said John having received the said corrody and being seized thereof, to give and assign the said corrody to the said chaplain to have to celebrate in the chapel for their sustenance for ever, as in the letters patent of our grandfather aforefaid, and the aforefaid John did afterwards also give and assign, according to the force and effect of the license of the King aforefaid, to the Abbot and Convent, the messuage, land, meadow, and rent, with the appurtenances, and to the chaplain the corrody which he obtained by the gift and grant of the Abbot and Convent. We now, at the request both of the present Abbot and Convent of Roche, who hold the messuage, land, meadow, and rent aforefaid, and of the present chaplain of the chapel, who receives the said corrody from the Abbey, and for 2 marks which the Abbot and Convent have paid to us, have granted and given license for us and our heirs ... . Witness, the King, at Westminster, July 8th, 1401.

Lambcote Grange

In the Confirmation of Pope Urban III in 1186, it was given the monks by Richard de Busli and Hugh de Drigwrt. In 1563 'Lamcottes' which had formerly been in the tenure of Robert and Agnes Hewet, was let by indenture under the common seal of the late monastery of Roche to John Wilkynson at 60s. per annum at the terms of St. Martin in the Winter and Pentecost equally. It was at this time granted by the crown to Charles Jackson.

Laughton

Nicholas, the Clerk gave a toft lying on the 4th side of St. John's Church, with 6 acres of land, now called Throapham, and which the monks held at the dissolution. In the time of Abbot Osmund, Cardinal Stephen gave the monks the prebend of Laughton. The Abbot of Roche held 30 bovates of land in the barony of Laughton in 1276. In 1558 the possessions in this place, lately belonging to the monastery of Roche, were on the 20th of October rated to Thomas Stephenson.

Lincoln

In 1275 the Abbot of Roche held a mansion here, which was then valued at 10s. per annum. At the dissolution its annual value was only 4s.

Lindrick

King Henry II gave 100 acres in Lindrick near the abbey, now called King's Wood. Alice, Countess of Eu, confirmed to the monks the wood of Lindrick in 1219. At the dissolution the annual falls of wood and underwood were valued at 40s.

Loversall

Reginald Gurvy quitclaimed to the monks the mill in this place. About the middle of the thirteenth century the monks of Roche gave what they had here, at Wadworth and at Alverley, to Robert de Ripariis, in exchange for his lands at Slade Hooton, two pieces of meadow in Walkeringham, and 100 in money.

Lumby

The monks had land in this place, which they demised to Richard Burton, Esq., and Catherine his wife, on the 20th October, 1441.

Maltby

Besides what Richard de Busli gave, Alan, the parson of Maltby, gave his right of common in two acres of land lying in Summer road.

Marr

Jordan, son of Philip de Marr, gave all his wood in this place with 4 tofts,2 oxgangs of land and the fourth part of an oxgang in this town and fields. By a charter dated at Woodhall, on the vigil of St. Nicholas, 1253, Thomas Fitz William confirmed to the monks all lands in Marr, of his fee, which they had of the gift of Jordan, son of Philip de Marr, and his ancestors. John, son of Jordan de Marr, gave to the monks of Roche 9 acres of land here with their capital messuage in the town, and homage and service of free men, rendering 10s. annually and scutage. This was also confirmed by Thomas Fitz William in a charter dated at Sprotborough, 1260. Richard, son of Hugh de Langethwaite, gave an annuity of 6s. out of a toft, and 12 acres of land in this place. The Abbot of Roche is said to have held eleven bovates of the fee of Thomas Fitz William, who held the Castle of Tickhill. The possesions at Marr and Bilham were valued at the dissolution at 8 18s. 6d. Marr Grange was granted in 1544 to John Bere.

Micklebring

Eugenia, relict of Gilbert de Micklebring, with the consent of Peter de Rhodes, his lord, gave four acres at Micklebring

Monk Bretton

In 1285 the Abbot and Convent of Roche sold their claim to the manor and advowson of the Church of Monk Bretton to the Prior and Convent of this place for 20s.

Monyash

John, son of Matthew de Eston, for the support of a light at the high altary gave the multure (toll) of twelve oxgangs of land in Monyash, Derbyshire, the tenants of which were to grind at the mills of the Monk's Grange, at Oneash, paying the twentieth bowl.

Morley

This place is situated near Greasborough. William Bacon with his corpse gave 9 acres of land here. The Prior of Nostel held four bovates of land here
Charter of Abbot Walter
We, Walter Abbot and the Convent of Roche, have granted and by our present charter have confirmed to Lord Thomas de Bellew (Bella Aqua) and his heirs or assigns all the service which Robert Barker, of Swinton, and his heirs have been accustomed to do for us for the land of Morley, with all things that can accrue to us from the land for ever, at an annual rent of 16d. at Pentecost, and to the House of St. Oswald in our name eight pence at the feast of St. Martin in the Winter for the said land of Morley. Witness, the Lords Ralph de Horbiry, Ralph de Normanville, John de Staynton, knights ; Ralph Haket, Robert Brinton, Roger de Bergh, James de Lyvet, Richard his brother, Raynder de Swinton, William de Roche, William de Swinton.

Newhall

On November 28th, 1552, the farm of one close lying in Newhall, containing 6 acres of pasture, in the occupation of Joane Cousen, widow, by indenture, as it is said, for a term of years, yielding therefrom at the feasts of Pentecost and St. Martin in the Winter equally per annum 13s.4d. and lately in the possession of the monasteries of Roche, was granted for divers considerations to the Right Honourable Lord Clinton, High Admiral of England.

Newland

On 20th of September in the 37th year of Henry VIII John Bellewe (Bella Aqua), Esq., and John Bloxolme, gent. paid to Sir John Williams, knight, treasurer of the Augmentation of the Revenues of the King's Crown, the sum of ... due to the King for the gift, grant, and clear purchase of one mansion or tenemente in the parishe of St. Stephen in Newland, late parcell of Roche, together with all and sigular the woodes and underwode growinge in and upon the premises.

Newsome

Robert de Scalcebi, Adam de Newmarch, and Roger de Marr gave the monks the grange at this place. The two first of these were witnesses to the Foundation Charter of the Abbey.

Nottingham

Philip de Oldcotes gave the monks a toft in this town and the service of another toft.

Oldcotes

The monks had property here in the time of King Richard I.

Oneash

Derbyshire - The grange was given to the monks soon after the foundation of the Abbey by William Avenal, Lord of Haddon. Richard de Vernun, with the consent of Avice, his wife, and of William his son and heir, confirmed all the land and pasture of his fee in this place, which William Avenal gave; and William Bassett, grandson of William Avenal, confirmed the same. Richard, son of William de Verum, confirmed the above, and also what the monks had in Sterndale, with the minerals, they paying to him and his heirs 15s. per annum, at his manor of Haddon. He also confirmed the tenement here which William Avenal gave. William, Earl of Ferrars, with the consent of Agnes his wife, before 1229 confirmed to the monks that way for their sheep and cattle going from their grange here, over the moor of Hartington and Heathcote, which William his father had granted to them, with some meadow ; they paying to him one mark per annum. In 1291, the possessions of the monks here: 4 bovates of land, a mill, mines,etc which were valued at 8 8s.8d. per annum. At the dissolution this grange was let to Thomas Sheldon.

Oustrop

William, son of William de Bladsworth, confirmed all the fishery in this place.

Overst

William, son of John de Vavasor, quitclaimed all his right in ward, escheat, etc.

Ravenfield

The monks had property here, the gift of Simon, son of Ralph de Tickhill. At the dissolution they paid 2s. per annum to the Hospital of St. Leonard at York, from land here.

Rawmarsh

Adam de Sancta Maria with his corpse gave the monks free common in this place with a toft in Haugh, also a toft and croft, two acres of land, and his wood lying between the road to Abdy and Fildingale, leading to the fields of Swinton, with liberty to enclose the same.
Charter of John and Hugh Brun
Know all present and future that we, John and Hugh, sons of Adam Brun, have remised and quitclaimed to God and the Blessed Mary and the Monks of Roche ... and claim which we had or might have had in all the land of Etheles, some of which Adam Brun our father held of Adam de Sancta Maria in the territory of Rawmarsh, with homages, wards, reliefs, escheats, and with all other profits which can in any way accrue to us or our heirs or assigns. Also, that neither we nor any other in our name can demand hereafter any right or claim in the said land with its appurtenances. In testimony of which we have to this writing placed our seals. Witness: Robert de Wath, clerk; Hugh de Brome, Thomas de Haby, Thomas de Lindric, Adam Depeker, Hugh de Wikesop (Worksop), and many others. The property which the monks had in Rawmarsh, Deepcar, Abdy, and Haugh was valued at the dissolution at 1 13s.9d. per annum.

Risby

Walter de Falcunbridge confirmed the grant of 2 oxgangs of land in this place made by Walter de Kadburne. The monks held this property as early as the year 1198

Roche

Roche Abbey enclosed a space of 31 acres. It was of a triangular shape, surrounded by a high substantial wall.This land was the gift of Richard de Busli and Richard Fitz Turgis.

It was confirmed to the monks by John de Busli, Alice Countess of Eu, Pope Urban III, and by many of the Kings of England. Henry III granted the monks free warren. The Abbot claimed free warren in Roche, Armthorpe, and Brantcliffe by charter of the Lord Henry the King, granted in 1250.
Charter of Adam Fitz Burnell of Elmsall
Know all that the Abbot and Convent of Roche are quit towards me and my heirs of 5 marks which they owed to my father in his charter, which they ever owed to my father, and I Adam and my heirs shall be able to demand hereafter nothing from the Abbot by reason of any debt which they at any time owed to my father. But if any one shall bring forward in the name of my father any charter to demand any debt from the Abbot and monks, I and my heirs with all our might will faithfully aid them. Witnesses: Jeremia, Parson of Rossington; William and John his brothers, Hugh de Langethwaite, Thomas de Sandal, Hugh de Bilham, John de Skellew, Reginald, Presbyter de Doncaster.
Elmsall lies close to the property which the monks held at Thurnscoe, Bilham, Skellow, Campsall, etc. The advowson of Roche Abbey belonged for some time to the two founders Richard de Busli and Richard Fitz Turgis and the value of it appears by one of the Clifford Inquisitions, to have been 40 each vacancy. The right of presentation held by Richard Fitz Turgis went at his death to his son Roger de Wickersley, and from him it passed to Constantia his daughter, who married William de Levet. It then continued in the Levet family until 1377, when John Levet granted it to Richard Barry by the following charter:
I, John Levet, son and heir of William Levet, of Hooton Levet, have given, granted, and by this my present charter confirmed to Richard Barry, citizen and merchant of London, the whole of my estate which I have or my ancestors have ever had in the foundation of the Abbey of Roche, in the county of York, together with the patronage and advowson of the same Abbey when it may have become vacant. I also give and grant to Richard a certain rent of 2s.6d. proceeding from all those lands and tenements with their appurtenances which were given by my aforefaid ancestors for the foundation of the abbey, along with a half-penny of rent with the appurtenances proceeding from a certain fulling mill situated in Abbey, granted as parcell of the foundation of the abbey. ... Witnesses: Lord John Fitzwilliam, William de Meleton, Thomas de Meteham, knights ; Henry de Grendon, Henry de Haloghby, Robert de Mersh, and others. Given at Hooton on the twentieth day of February in the 51st year of the reign of King Edward, the third after the conquest.
In 1420 there was a fine between William Garth, John Multhorpe, and Thomas Stokes, plaintiffs ; and William Levet of Hooton Levet, and Elizabeth his wife, deforciants, of the advowson of the Abbey of Roche. The right to William, John, and Thomas. Soon after this the moiety of the Fitz Turgis family seems to have become united with that of the De Busli, for in 1446, Maud, Countess of Cambridge, was styling herself 'founder of Roche', and at the dissolution only one founder is returned, Henry Clifford, Earl of Cumberland, in whose hands it remained until they were sold.

Rochedale

The monks acquired considerable property in this parish at an early date from Lord Robert de Stapelton. His grandson Warinus de Scargill, confirmed this in a charter:
Know that I, have granted and confirmed to the Abbot and Convent of Roche all the gifts and grants which Lord Robert, son of William de Stapelton, my great grandfather, whose heir I am, made to them. All that land and tenements which are called Hillbrigthorpe, by these boundaries : by the way which leadeth from Stone Edge to Knot Hill and passeth the water of Tame and so upwards to the other Knot Hill, and all that Knot Hill even unto Woodward Hill,so far as my land reacheth, with all buildings, woods, meadows, etc, and all appurtenances, and all other liberties to the said forest belonging. I have also granted to the Abbot and Convent for me and my heirs full power to enclose all the said tenements by the boundaries altogether as walled and the walls if thrown down to make up and renew as often and when they may please.Also common of pasture from the great way which leadeth from Stone Edge to the Bridgewater of Tame toward the north to the boundary aforesaid ; and from Knot Hill to Woodward Hill, as the water departs towards the wood of Tame. Witnesses:Lord Edmund de Wastenayes, Lord Thomas de Schofelde (Sheffield?), Lord John de Doncastre, knights; John of the chamber of Stapelton, William my son, and others. Dated at Roche, on Sunday, in the feast of the Conversion of St. Paul, in the year of Grace one thousand three hundred and fourteen.

Roxby

The Abbot of Roche derived a large portion of his revenue from the property which he held here. There is a ready mode of communication between it and Roche by the rivers Trent and Idle, which the monks made use of.

Sandal

In 1232 King Henry III confirmed what the monks held here.

Sandbeck

On St. Giles' day, 1241, the monks obtained their first property in this place by the following charter:

Charter of Idonea de Vipont
Know, that I, Idonea de Vipont, have given, conceded, and by this my present charter have confirmed the whole of my manor of Sandbec with my corpse, with the homages and services, as well of free men as of copyholders, and with all commons, liberties, and easements pertaining to the same manor everywhere within and without the said vill of Sandbec, to be held and had for a pure and perpetual alms free and quiet from all services, customs, exactions, and demands. And I, Idonea, and my heirs will warrant the said manor of Sandbec with its appurtenances to the said monks, and will acquit and defend it for ever against all men. Richard de Horbiry, Robert de Wickersley, knights; Walter, seneschal in the castle of Tickhill, Peter de Wadworth, William de Stainton, John de Monteby, Hugh de Scelhall, John de Wlvethwait.The right of the Abbot to this manor was disputed by Robert de Vipont, the 2nd grandson of Idonea:
Testification of Richard de Boyville
To all who shall see or hear these letters, and especially to the twelve knights elected to make the great assize between the Abbot of Roche and Robert de Vipont, Richard de Boyvill in the Lord eternal health. Wishing to inform you upon the oath which is about to be made to you, I teftify that on the day of St. Giles, in the year of our Lord 1241, my lady Idonea de Busli, of her own free will, gave to the Church of Roche the whole manor of Sandbec, with the ploughs and all other things pertaining to it. Witnesses: Sir John de Croxton, Sir Thomas de Bury, Sir R. de Boyvill, knights ; and Sir J. de Monby.
The right of the Abbot to this property was again questioned in 1265, when an inquisition was taken by Robert de Ullay, at Anston, the jurors being William de Rhodes, Adam de Monte Acuto, ... to examine whether the Abbot of Roche had intruded himself into the manor of Sandbec, which belonged to Robert de Vipont. Jury found that the Abbot had not intruded himself, but was in seizin before the troubles, during, and after the troubles. John, son of Gilbert de Ewes, gave the monks 6 acres and a half of land in Sandbec. Hugh, Marshal de Sywardthorp, gave his mill in Sandbec with the pool and watercourse.
In 1535 the annual value of the property which the Abbot held in Sandbec was valued at 14 1s., out of this he had to pay to the Hospital of St. Leonard at York 1s., and to the Prior of Blythe, for a parcel of land in Sandbec, 1s. per annum.
At the dissolution the manor of Sandbec was granted to Richard Turke, gentleman, citizen of London, and in 3 Edw. VI. he had license to alienate it to Robert Saunderson and his heirs.

Scawsby

In 1198 King Richard I confirmed whatever the monks had in this place. At the dissolution they had property here, of no great consequence, as it with 3 other places was only valued at 11s.5d. per annum.

Serlby

Matilda de Moles, before 1208, gave the monks all the lands which the men of Blythe held of Hugh de Moles, her brother, and afterwards of her in the fields of Serlby in the county of Nottingham. (See Torworth) Hugh de Moles with his body gave his mills here with the suit thereof. (See Blythe) He also gave a fishery above and below the mills, with one oxgang of land and the service of 1s. from Alan de Clifton and his heirs, for one oxgang of land in the same territory; and of Norman, son of Robert, for another oxgang. The monks had no property here at the dissolution.

Sezacres

From the confirmation of Pope Urban III - William de Moles and William Fitz Gerard gave Sezacres with its appurtenances.

Slade Hooton

The Abbot of Roche obtained what he had here from Robert de Ripers in exchange for other lands:
Charter of Abbot Richard and Robert de Ripers
It is agreed between Richard Abbot of Roche and the monks, on the one part; and Robert de Ripers on the other, that the aforefaid Richard the Abbot and the monks, for themselves and their successors, have given, conceded, and confirmed to Robert de Ripers, for his homage and service, and exchange of his land of Slade Hooton, in addition to 6 marks of yearly rent, and for the exchange of two pieces of meadow in Walkeringham which Robert held, and for 100 which he gave to the same, their lands and meadows which they had in Wadworth and Alverley, and in Loversal, with the wood and farm which they had in Wadworth, with the mill, site, pools and waters, and with all kinds of suits everywhere pertaining to the mill within the vills and without, to be held and had by Robert and his heirs for ever Saving, nevertheless, to the said Abbot and Monks and their successors their land in Wellingley. But Robert and his heirs, render the aforefaid Richard and the monks and their successors only 27d. per annum, 12d. at the feast of St. Martin and 15d. at Whitsuntide. Richard and Monks,shall not make or erect, nor allow Peter de Wadworth to make or erect any mill,- neither water-mill nor wind-mill in the territory of Wadworth to the hurt or detriment or grievance of the aforefaid Robert or his heirs. But Peter de Wadworth and his heirs shall have free mulcture of the whole of their malt and corn of their own proper homestead in the aforefaid mills for ever without let from any one. And Richard Abbot and his Monks, etc, all the lands and mills, pools and waters, and sites of the mills, and the wood and wood farm, and meadows etc. Now, for this donation, and exchange, Robert has given to Richard Abbot and Monks, etc., all his land in Slade Hooton, with the villains and their goods and chattels etc, without any restraint, and his meadow which he had in Walkeringham, and 100 by rendering for the land of Slade Hooton to the lords of Tickhill 6d. per annum at Easter, and to Arnold Bisset and his heirs the services which pertain to the aforefaid land, as is contained in the charter which Robert had of Arnold, and which Robert freed to the Abbot and Monks for the warrants and security of their agreement, and by rendering Adam, son of William de Walkeringham, for the aforefaid meadow 1d. per annum at the feast of St. Mary Magdalen. And that all here in this writing may remain ratified, firm, and stable. Witnesses: Simon de Heden, Robert de Wlrington, Richard le Blund of Blythe, Robert de Misterton, Hugh de Moles, Henry de Darley, Richard de Louweder, Herbert de Wlrington, Gerard de Hedon, Jeffery de Turmiston, Nicholas, son of Jeffery de Erdesale, Thomas de Wlrington, and others.The date of this charter is between 1238 and 1254.

Smeaton

Simon, son of Algar de Smeaton, with his corpse gave half an oxgang of land here. This property, together with what the monks had in Scawsby, Campsal, and Askern, was valued in 1535 at 11s.5d. per annum.

Snaith

Edmund de Lacy, constable of Chester, granted and confirmed to the monks all that they held in his socage of Snaith, in 1158. (See Tickhill)

Stainford

The monks had property here in 1231. In 1355, an indenture was made between the Abbot and Convent of Roche on the one part, and Thomas de Rillington and 5 others, parishioners of the Church of Hatfield, on the other part, that the Abbot of Roche having the Church of Hatfield appropriated, granted and permitted that the parishioners and other the inhabitants of the town of Stamford might, by the Archbishop's license, maintain at their own cost a chaplain to celebrate divine service in the Chapel of Stainford, newly builded, for the space of 3 years daily, excepting on Sundays and other great festivals, whereon they were to repair to the Parish Church of Hatfield. The tithes which the Abbot of Roche derived from Stainford were valued at 5 per annum, out of which he had to pay 4s. 2d. to the Provost of Stainford. The monks held their property here until the dissolution.

Stainton

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Stansal

Among the evidences of Godfrey Higgins, Esq., of Skellow Grange, in a charter dated 1236, by which William Chaworth and William, the son of Eudo, chief lords of Wadworth, declare that they release all claims in lands of Sir Jordan Fitz-Payne, lord of Stansal, Wellingley, and Willsic, which Jordan has given to the monks of Roche in pure and perpetual alms, to wit, from that ditch which lies between Magilldhylls across as far as the bounds of Wadworth, and the fee of Wellingley and Stansal, and runs from the arable land of Wadworth on the west until it comes opposite Stansal on the east, lengthwise, and from the said ditch to another ditch which has been made in Littlemorye, from the south through the whole of that land which is in the western district: as far as the arable land of Stansal and the bounds of Wadworth.

Stirrup

Gerard de Stirrup gave turbary here before the year 1186. In 1276 the Abbot of Roche held twenty acres of meadow and a toft and croft in Stirrup of the fee of Tickhill, the former being the gift of Hamel de Bugthorpe, in the time of Henry III. Robert Burton was bailiff of Stirrup at the dissolution, and received from the Abbot 10s. per annum. In 1563 Robert de Hitchcock obtained possession of that messuage in Stirrup in the occupation of Richard More, late belonging to the Monastery of Roche.

Streetthorpe

Formerly called Stirestorp, Tristrop, and Stristerop. Grantee, Richard Stapleton. 6 Edw. VI. All the rents and profits in Streetthorpe, in the County, are worth in: The rent of one tenement, with all lands, meadows, pastures, and commons to the same belonging, thus demised to Brian Hastings, of Fenwek (Fenwick), by Indenture under the common seal of the late Monastery of Roche, freely resigned, dated 24 Jan., in the 24th year of the reign of King Henry VIII., to have to the said Brian Hastings, Elizabeth his wife, and Franc his son, from the date of the presents to the end and term of their lives, paying thence at the terms of St. Martin and Pentecost equally 2 6s.8d. per annum.

Strafford

The monks paid to the bailiff of the King of the wapentake of Strafford 6s. 8d. per annum.

Templeborough

The Roman encampment came into the hands of the monks of Roche in the time of Hen. III. Ralph, son of Richard de Savile, gave with his body to the Abbot of Roche a carucate of land in Brinsworth, which Peveril held, and Templeborough in the territory of Brinsworth. Witness, Peter de Wadworth. 20 years after the dissolution the property which the monks had held here is described in an inquisition of Lionel Reresby, of Thriberg, as '2 mills and 20 acres of pasture called Templebarrow, with appurtenances in Ikkyls (Ickles), held of the Queen as of her Monastery of Roche lately dissolved, in socage, by fealty and rent of 13s,4d, for all services and demands'.

Thorne

William gave the monks the tithe of the eels taken at his fishery here, after the full tithe had been taken, which belonged to the monks of Lewis. The tithes were valued at the dissolution at 7 per annum.

Throapham

The monks held property here at the dissolution. (See Laughton)

Thurnscoe

The monks had considerable property in this place before 1186, the gift of William Vavasor. They also had two carucates of land in Thurnscoe, which belonged to William Paynel, and which he held in capite of the lord the King of the barony of Hooton. In 5 John, 1203, there was a fine between Galfred Luterel and Frethesant his wife, and Isabella, her sister, plaintiffs ; and Osmund Abbot of Roche, tenant of 12 bovates of land with the appurtenances, in Thurnscoe. In 20 Hen. III., 1236, there was a fine between William, son of Richard de Barnby, plaintiff; and Robert Luterel, whom Reginald Abbot of Roche called to warranty, and who made warranty to him of 10 messuages, one mill, and 20 bovates of land, with the appurtenances in Thurnscoe. Verdict for Robert Luterel. Andrew Luterel confirmed all that the monks had in Thurnscoe. In the thirteenth century the monks obtained the two following charters:
Charter of Ralph de Rainville
I, Ralph de Rainville, of Thurnscoe, have granted, given, and by this my present charter have confirmed for the welfare of my soul and Saint Mary and the Monks of Roche, the attachment of the pond of their mill of Thurnscoe upon my fee of Holme, in pure and perpetual alms, free and quit from all service, exaction, and demand. And in accordance with which it shall be lawful for the said monks at their will to raise, and amend the pond, as they shall think expedient, and to take land upon my fee of Holme as often as shall be necessary, for raising and repairing the pond. And I, Ralph, and my heirs will warrant, quit, and defend all the aforefaid to the monks against all men for ever. Witnesses: Lord Robert de Wykereslay, knight; Peter de Waddeworth,Thomas de Lasci, Hugh de Lascy, Wm. de Tatewyc ( Todwick), serving man; Johanna Whiethwait.
Charter of Hugh Lascy
I Hugh, son of Hugh Lascy, of Thurnscoe, have granted and by this my present charter confirmed to the Monks of Roche all the land which my father granted to the same in exchange for ever at Hoxebrigge, and all the meadow which they hold of the gift of my father, as his charter testified. Moreover, I have remised and quitclaimed to the said monks from me and my heirs and assigns for ever all right and claim which I had or might have had in the meadow of the aforefaid monks, as it is bounded by the ditch before the gate of the grange of Thurnscoe after the manner of a farm or common herbage-ground. In such sort, however, that if any cattle of those of my heirs by reason of a defect in the ditch shall enter the said meadow we shall not quarrel about it, and for making greater security to the monks in all the aforefaid, I have corroborated the present page by placing my seal. Witnesses: Jordan, son of Jordan de L'isle, Jordan de Mar, Adam Paynel, Robert Lascy, Adam de Thurnscoe, Payn de Mar, Richard de St. Paul, John Grimbald.
Hugh, son of Reiner de Darfield, gave the monks an oxgang of land here. Richard de Thurnscoe also gave another oxgang of land in this place.
In 1316 the Abbot of Roche was certified pursuant to writ tested at Clipstone (Notts) 5th March, as lord of the townships of Armthorpe and Thurnscoe, and joint lord of Todwick. The Abbot had a charter of free warren here from Richard II. The property which the monks had at Thurnscoe at the dissolution was valued, together with 8d. perquisites of courts, at 12 10s. 8d. per annum.

Thurstonland

It is thought the manor of Thurstonland was given to the monks at the same time as the advowson of Hatfield by Earl Warren. At the dissolution the annual rents amounted to 8 19s.7d.; Thomas Green being steward, and Henry Gillott, bailiff here, and each receiving 20s. per annum. The grange of the monks possessed a right of stray and pasturage for 20 sheep upon the commons and waste lands in the lordship of Shelley, a privilege which no doubt had been granted by one of the early lords of Shelley. In 1532 John Walker, of Thurstonland, clothier, obtained a lease from the Abbot and Convent of Roche, of lands in Thurstonland, given under the seal of the monastery. In 1540 the King granted to John Storthes, of Shyttylyngton, gentleman, all his manor of Thurstonland with all his rights, membres, and appurtenances,etc., late to the Monastrye of Roche, and now dissolved, belonging,etc., and all other messuages, houses, byldyngs, mylnes, granges, lands, tenements, meadows, pastures, comons, waters,etc., to hold of the said sovereign lord the King, his heirs and successors

Tickhill

I, Edmund de Lacy, constable of Chester, have granted and by this my present charter confirmed to God and the Abbot and Convent of Roche of the Cistercian order, all the gifts and sales made to them in my barony of Pontefract, in my constabulary, in my barony of Tickhill and in my socage of Snaith, which they held at Easter, 1258, according to the tenure of the charters of the donors and vendors, and this concession and confirmation I have made to them for the welfare of my soul and of my father, John de Lacy, and of Margaret my mother, and of Alice my wife, and of all my ancestors and heirs. Witnesses : Adam Abbot of Kirkstal, Sir John de Hoderode, seneschal of Pontefract; Robert de St. Andrew, John Beke, knights; Sir Osbertus, rector of Silkston; Sir Robert de Nottingham, rector of Almonbury; Mr. William de Lichfield, rector of Braiton, and many others.

Tinsley

Charter of Walter Abbot of Roche
I, Walter Abbot and the Convent of Roche have granted and by the present charter confirmed to Robert, son of Roger de Tinsley, for his homage and service 2 bovates of land, with the appurtenances, in the vill of Tinsley, which he had of the gift of Walter his brother, to have and to hold to him and his heirs of the said Abbot and Convent of Roche freely and quietly, paying thence per annum to the said Abbot and Convent of Roche 8s. in the grange of Roche, to wit, 4s. at Pentecost and 4s. at the feast of St. Martin in the Winter, for all service save foreign, as far as belongs to 2 bovates of land of the said fee in the said vill. With such understanding, however, that the said Abbot and Convent are not bound to make warranty of the feoffment of the said land to the said Robert or his heirs. In witness whereof the said Abbot and Convent and the said Robert to the parts of this charter have alternately set their seals. Witnesses : Johann de Stevinton (Swinton ?), Robert Bruerton, Peter de Lettewell, Galfrid de Helgheby. 1260.

Todwick

The first property which the monks had in this place was given them before 1186 by Ralph Tortemayns. It is stated that Ralph Tortemayns sold to the House of Roche, Little Todwick, and whatsoever appertained to it. William Tortemayns gave all his wood to the monks with the land on which it grew. He also confirmed the grant of pasture for eight score sheep in the common pasture in Todwick. Gregory de Todwick and Alice his wife gave two acres of land in Todwick with their right to the advowson of the church of the same place. Nicholas de St. Paul confirmed the grant of Gregory and his wife, and gave all his meadow lying between his house and the road towards the north in Todwick. He also confirmed the grant of 10 acres of land and pasture for 60 sheep, given by his father (William de St. Paul), and gave all his land between Botyldwellwang and the grange towards the north of the way leading from Aston to Anston ; and on the other side of the way towards the south he gave one acre and a half, with pasture for nine score sheep in Todwick, together with common pasture through his land for all the monks' cattle going from Todwick grange.
Charter of Maud de Lovetot
Maud de Lovetot, formerly wife of Gerard de Furnival. Be it known to your community that I, in my widowhood have given and by this my charter confirmed to the Monks of Roche, all the lands in the territory of Todwick, with their appurtenances, which Ralph Tortemayns and William Tortemayns, and William de St. Paul and Nicholas de St. Paul gave to the said monks, to have and hold, as the charters which they have from them testify. Witnesses: Robert, parson of Misterton, seneschal ; Ralph de Ecclesal, Philip Scrope, Walter de Heyr, Roger Whiston, William de Lindrick, Ralph de Bauuent.
In 1309 King Edward II granted license to Edmund de Wastenays to give and assign 20 acres of land with the appurtenances in Todwick to the Abbot and Convent of Roche, in exchange for 20 acres of land with the appurtenances in the same place. All the property which the Abbot had in Todwick was granted October 15, 37 Hen. VIII, to William Ramsden and Ralph Wyfe, and John and Roger Wyfe, sons of Ralph:
All that grange called Todwick Grange, with the appurtenances in Todwick, lately belonging and pertaining to the monastery de Rupe, otherwise called Roche, now dissolved and parcel of the possessions lately thereto belonging, and all the houses, edifices, barns, stables, dovecotes, gardens, orchards, lands, meadows, pastures, commons, and hereditaments of ours whatever in Todwick and elsewhere, wheresoever in our said county of York, in any way appertaining or belonging to the said grange, called Todwick Grange, or being with the said grange demised, let, used, or occupied; and also all that messuage and tenement called the Abbot's House with the appurtenances, now or lately in the tenure of Janet Renfrew and Hugh Renfrew of Throapham, situated in the vill of Todwick, formerly appertaining and belonging to the late monastery de Rupe or Roche, and parcel of the possessions thereto lately belonging, etc., and which said grange called Todwick Grange and the rest of the premises in Todwick aforefaid now extend to the clear annual value of 5 10s. 8d. To have and to hold, etc., rendering from the said grange and the rest of the premises aforefaid 11s.8d.

Torworth

There was a fine levied at Leicester the 1st Monday after the feast of St. Andrew, 10 John (1208) between Osmund Abbot of Roche, and Thomas de Sandal and Matilda his wife, summoned to warrant to the said Abbot 1 bovate of land with the appurtenances in Torworth, whereof the said Abbot and Convent had the charter of the said Matilda in these words:
Charter of Matilda de Moles
Be it known that I, Matilda de Moles, have given and by this my charter confirmed to God and St. Mary of Roche and the monks 1 bovate of land with the appurtenances, in Torworth; viz., that which was Alexander Crassis, and one multure of land of 38 acres in the territory of the said town, and pasture for 100 sheep everywhere in the common pasture of the said town, and furthermore all the lands which the men of Blythe held of Hugh de Moles, my brother, and afterwards of me in the fields of Serlby and Torworth, and all the rents of those lands, etc.
The Abbot had in 1276, 100 acres of land of the gift of Hugh and Matilda de Moles in the time of King John. In 1246 there was a fine levied between 'William' Reginald (?) Abbot of Roche, and Adam de Holtal and Donysia, his wife, of 6 acres of land with the appurtenances in Torworth.

Wadworth

Reginald Gurvy de Tickhill quitclaimed all his right in the mill at Wadworth. Maud, relict of Matthew de Tickhill, gave 2 acres of land here. Eudo, son of Godfrey de Wadworth, gave lands to the monks in Wadworth, and confirmed what Maud had given them. Peter de Wadworth gave the monks 46 acres of his woodland lying on the west side of the wood extending from the west field of Wadworth to the north. He also gave 3 oxgangs of land on the north side of the north field; 35 acres and one rood in the west field; and 39 and a half acres and half a rood in the east field, in consideration of 18 marks lent to him by the Abbot of Roche in his great necessity, and also of 50 marks which he owed, and which the Abbot paid to Aaron the Jew, at York, and his brother. The witnesses to this deed were Ralph de Normanville, knight; Reginald de Kettleburgh, John de Armthorpe, H. de Bilham, Alexander de Stubbs, Peter de Rossington, Peter de Letwell, Ingeram de Stirap, Otho, son of Mo. de Wilghesich (Wilsick), Adam Leming, and others.
The charter of Aaron, son of Josey, and of Leo, bishop, and of Samuel, his son, Jews of York. Be it known to all the faithful of Christ, etc., that Peter de Wadworth and his heirs are acquit, etc. Moreover, be it known that we have quitclaimed to the Abbot and Convent of Roche 3 oxgangs of land and 46 acres which they have of the gift of the said Peter, etc.
William, son of John de Vavasour, quitclaimed in 1277 all his right in wards, escheats, etc. in Wadworth.

Walkeringham

The monks had considerable property in Walkeringham, Lincolnshire: The grant, gift, and confirmation which Henry, son of Richard de Walkeringham, by his charter made to the monks of Roche of 2 tofts, 552 acres of land, and 11 acres of meadow, with the appurtenances in Walkeringham, and of all the pasture Wlger-oxgang, everywhere in the whole common pertaining to the vill of Walkeringham;
The grant, also, gift, and confirmation which Henry, son of Robert Arnewy of Walkeringham, by his charter made to the monks;
The grant, also, gift, and confirmation which Henry, son of Robert Maumirr of Walkeringham, by his charter made to the aforefaid monks;
The grant, moreover, gift, and confirmation which Henry made to the aforefaid monks of the homage and whole service of Henry, son of Isabella, and his heirs;
The grant, moreover, and confirmation which Adam, son of William de Walkeringham, by his charter made to the aforesaid monks which they had of the gift of Roger de Osberton, of the fee of the said Adam;
The grant, by Geoffery, son of Alan de Trent
King Henry VIII by his letters patent, dated 1544, granted to Sir Richard Lee, knight, and his heirs, the grange and farm of Walkeringham, with all the lands, meadows, and pastures late belonging to the Monastery of Roche.

Wallingwells

The monks had property here at the dissolution. At Wallingwells was a House of Benedictine Nuns, founded about the same time as Roche.

Wellingley

Robert Fitz-Payne gave lands, and Jordan Fitz-Payne pastures. King Richard I confirmed to the monks the grange of Wellingley, and from that time up to the dissolution it seems to have continued in their possession

Wickersley

Richard Fitz-Turgis de Wickersley, one of the founders of Roche Abbey, gave the monks 50 loads of wood out of his wood in Wickersley

Wilsick

Jordan Fitz-Payne gave the monks land here

Winterton

Winterton, in Lincolnshire, is mentioned in the Confirmation of King Henry III as one of the places in which the monks had property. At the dissolution it was valued at 1 1s. per annum.

Winteringham

Hamelin Bardolph and Katharine his wife, and Robert, son of Eudo, gave the monks land in this place, which Hugh, son of Ralph Bardolph, confirmed. Winteringham in Lincolnshire, is 3 miles north of Roxby Grange. At the dissolution what the monks had here in pasture was valued at 10s.per annum.

Wyvelsworth

Mentioned in the Confirmation of King Henry III as one of the places in which the monks had property.

Woodhouse Mill

The Abbot of Roche received 1 9s. per annum rent from the mill called Wodhousemyll.

York

Agnes, the Prioress of the Convent of St. Clement,York, granted to the monks a certain piece of land leading from their orchard to the river Ouse, for which they paid 3.

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