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Pedigree of Savile of Methley Hall

Methley Hall
Methley Hall

During the second and third quarters of the seventeenth century gentlemen and wealthy clothiers in the Halifax district created a unique style of domestic building. Though their gabled halls were arranged in a traditional manner, the decorative details applied to the exteriors were amazing in their virtuosity. An influential prototype was the (demolished) Methley Hall, a fifteenth-century structure enlarged between 1588 and 1611 by Sir John Savile and his son, Sir Henry. Sir John was a founder member of the Society of Antiquaries and a friend of William Camden, (1605); his youngest brother, Thomas, also had a considerable reputation as an authority on British antiquities. It was therefore natural for the Saviles to favour elements taken from Gothic architecture as well as classical forms. Methley was the first house in the West Riding to have an enormous hall window divided by numerous mullions and transoms. The master masons responsible for the building were probably those members of the Akroyd family whose names appear in the contemporary Methley parish register. John, Abraham and Martin Akroyd also erected the first West Riding buildings to have distinctive windows shaped like a rose or a Catherine-wheel. The original source of inspiration for these may have been Robert Smythson, the great Elizabethan architect, who in 1599 designed a circular window divided into twelve lights.

Pedigree of Savile of Methley Hall
Pedigree of Savile of Methley Hall

William Wilkinson, of Astley, married Jennet,a widow, daughter of Henry Savile, in Halifax in 1610.

Source:Visitation of Yorkshire, Sir.William Dugdale, A.D. 1665 and 1666

John Savile(1644-1717) of Methley, son of John Savile and Margaret Garraway, bought the Thrybergh estate from the Reresby family. John Savile drowned in a draw-well in the court of the White Bear, at Wakefield. It was left uncovered, and he fell into it on a dark night. There were several gentlemen at the inn, one of whom, William Watson, swung down by the rope in the hope of saving Mr. Savile. Both got into the bucket, but while they were ascending, the rope broke, and they were drowned.

Henry Savile, son of John died in 1723 and the daughter Elizabeth, wife of John Finch, was heiress to the Thrybergh Estates. After the death of Elizabeth , Thrybergh went to her son, Savile Finch, esq. of Thrybergh, M. P. for Malton, who had no issue, and having full power over the estates, left them to his wife, Judith, daughter of John Fullerton. She resided, at Thrybergh for twenty years after her husband's decease, and dying in 1803, bequeathed her possessions to her own family, the Fullertons, which included an annuity of 500 to her nephew, John Fullerton of Bramley Hall.

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