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Tickhill

The honour of Tickhill was Crown property from about 1290, and subsequently became part of the estates of the duchy of Lancaster.

Tickhill, was described in 1822 as a small market-town, in the parish of its name, and in the wapentake of Strafforth and Tickhill, West Riding. It is 156 miles from London, 7 from Doncaster, and 4 from Bawtry. The town is seated on the borders of Nottinghamshire, and the streets composing it are disposed nearly in the form of a cross, by the roads from Worksop, to Doncaster, and from Bawtry to Rotherham. This town was formerly highly noted for its malting business, and it is still the principal trade of the place. There is also a respectable manufactory for paper, belonging to Mr. George Wilkinson. The town has several large malt kilns, three corn mills, and a paper mill. The only object here, calculated to excite interest with the curious traveller, is the castle, the ruins of which are still sufficient to convey an idea of its once great strength and magnitude. Nothing is known of Tickhill until the Norman conquest, previous to which it is said to have been a village called Dadesley, and a well bearing that name still remains.The edifice was founded by Roger de Busli, one of the Conqueror's followers, and in 1646 it was dismantled by order of the parliament. John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, resided at Tickhill castle, once called Th'wick hill . The noble baronial castle was built upon the mount which had previously been fortified. After the death of Roger de Busli, William II, granted the honour of Tickhill for a large sum of money to Robert de Belesme; but Henry I resumed it, and held it during his whole reign. In the reign of Stephen it was claimed, and for some time held by the Earl of Eu and William de Clairfait, as heirs of Roger de Busli. For a short period it was held by the Earl of Chester; but when Henry II, ascended the throne, he entered into full possession of the honour of Tickhill, which was frequently a bone of contention between the representatives of the Busli family and the crown, during the reigns of John, Henry III, and the two first Edwards, when the barons were often at war with kingly authority.

Whilst Richard I, was with the crusades, in Palestine, Tickhill castle was seized by his brother, Prince John, and the garrison, under Robert de la Mare, was besieged by Hugh de Pudsey, bishop of Durham, and after an obstinate resistance was obliged to surrender; after which, Roger de Laci, lord of Pontefract, who had held the castle for the crown, is said to have hanged many of the persons who had delivered the fortress to Prince John.

Lord Scarborough is lessee of the manor, under the crown, and holds courts leet and baron twice in the year.The other owners of land in the parish are, the Earl of Scarborough, Wm. Walker, Esq., Edward Fox, Esq., E Laughton, Esq., the trustees of the late John Jarratt, Esq. And many smaller proprietors.

The places of worship here are the parish church of St. Mary, a handsome structure, in the later style of English architecture, having a fine tower with pinnacles, and the interior is ornamented with some handsome monuments and contains effigies of a knight and his lady, and an altar tomb of William de Estfield, the founder of the church, who died in 1386.Near the church is a Maison Dieu, comprising fourteen alms houses for poor widows ; and there is a free school in the church yard. and a chapel each for the Calvinists and Methodists. The four principal streets have many genteel houses with lawns and gardens, and are disposed nearly in the form of a cross, by the roads from Rotherham to Bawtry, and from Doncaster to Worksop, at the intersection of which, in a spacious area, stands the market cross, consisting of eight lofty pillars, supporting a neat dome.The soil is generally a fertile sandy loam, with substratums of lime, clay, and red sandstone, except on the north east side of the parish where there is a low tract of peat moss, which borders upon Nottinghamshire, and was anciently an impassable morass, extending from the castle hill northward, to the level of Hatfield chase; but the greater part of it has been cultivated, since the enclosure about 60 years ago.The market day is Friday, but it is now almost disused. The Parish of Tickhill is in two townships:

The total population of the parish amounted in 1801, to 1150; in 1811, to 1572; in 1821, to 1884; and in 1831, to 2084 souls.

In digging the foundation of a stable in Sunderland street, in 1834, a strong earthen jar was found, containing 375 small silver coins of the reign of Henry III, and with very bold impressions.

Source: Pigot's directory 1829 and 1834, White's directory, 1837.

Approach to Tickhill, South Yorkshire
Castlegate, Tickhill, South Yorkshire
St. Mary's Churchyard, Tickhill, South Yorkshire
St. Mary's Churchyard, Tickhill, South Yorkshire
St. Mary's Church, Tickhill, South Yorkshire
St. Mary's Church,Tickhill, South Yorkshire
St. Mary's Churchyard, Tickhill, South Yorkshire
St. Mary's Church,Tickhill, South Yorkshire
St. Mary's Church,Tickhill, South Yorkshire
St. Mary's Church,Tickhill, South Yorkshire
St. Mary's Church,Tickhill, South Yorkshire
St. Mary's Church,Tickhill, South Yorkshire
St. Mary's Church,Tickhill, South Yorkshire
St. Mary's Church,Tickhill, South Yorkshire
St. Mary's Church,Tickhill, South Yorkshire
St. Mary's Church,Tickhill, South Yorkshire
St. Mary's Church,Tickhill, South Yorkshire
St. Mary's Church,Tickhill, South Yorkshire
St. Mary's Church,Tickhill, South Yorkshire
St. Mary's Church,Tickhill, South Yorkshire
,Tickhill, South Yorkshire
Tickhill, South Yorkshire
Tickhill, South Yorkshire
The Mill Dam, Tickhill, South Yorkshire
The Mill Dam Tickhill, South Yorkshire
The Mill Dam Tickhill, South Yorkshire
The Mill Dam Tickhill, South Yorkshire
The Mill Dam Tickhill, South Yorkshire
The Water Mill , Tickhill, South Yorkshire
Rowlands Bridge, Tickhill, South Yorkshire
Tickhill, South Yorkshire
11th century gatehouse leading to Tickhill Castle, South Yorkshire
Tickhill, South Yorkshire
Tickhill, South Yorkshire
Tickhill, South Yorkshire
Tickhill, South Yorkshire
Tickhill, South Yorkshire
Tickhill, South Yorkshire
Tickhill, South Yorkshire
Tickhill, South Yorkshire
View of Harworth from Lindrick, Tickhill, South Yorkshire
View of Harworth from Lindrick,Tickhill, South Yorkshire

Tickhill Castle Originally a wooden castle with a 70 foot high motte. In 1100 a stone wall and gatehouse were added, much of which still stands, and in 1180 an eleven sided stone tower was erected on the motte. Only the foundations of this now remain.

The site is owned by the Duchy of Lancaster and is visible from the road, it opens one day a year.Car parking is by the side of the road.

Gallery Index

Tickhill in 1900